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The Rehabilitation Engineering Center (REC) is a joint Center between two of the best universities in North Carolina. The strategy for the Center is to build onto the medical strengths of UNC – Chapel Hill and the engineering know-how of NC State.  This initiative of the College of Engineering at North Carolina State University and the School of Medicine at the University of North Carolina is a state technical assistance, education and research center that evaluates, designs, develops, and promotes improved care and function for individuals with short and long term rehabilitation needs.

News & Events

JOIN BME IN CONGRATULATING DR. HELEN HUANG—THE NEW DIRECTOR OF THE REHABILITATION ENGINEERING CENTER!
Please join us in offering Professor Helen Huang your warmest congratulations on her recent appointment as the director of the Rehabilitation Engineering Center (REC) at NC State and UNC. The REC, like BME itself, unites the University of North Carolina and NC State University in order to encourage and engender groundbreaking collaborative science between the two institutions.  The Co-Interim Director of the Center, Dr. Rick Wysk, commented that Dr. Huang is the “perfect person for this opportunity.” Louis Martin-Vega, the Dean of NC State's College of Engineering, in addition to offering his congratulations, noted that he “looks forward to her leadership in this very special and unique effort in our College!” With her innovative research in the creation of neural-machine interfacing technologies, Dr. Huang is perfectly positioned and qualified to lead the Rehabilitation Engineering Center as it continues to prosper and grow. Congratulations to Helen on this exciting new step in her career!
 
Special Seminar Announcements

Please check back for the Fall REC Seminar Announcement.

 
CORE FACULTY MEMBER DR. HELEN HUANG FEATURED IN NORTH CAROLINA NEWSPAPERS

Dr. Helen Huang’s work on brain-connected prostheses has once again made an appearance in the press. In late January, both the Charlotte Observer and the Raleigh News and Observer reported on Dr. Huang’s development of smarter prostheses that utilize brain signals to help deal with changes in terrain, speed, and type of activity. The goal of Huang’s work is to program a bionic leg to respond to specific brain activity patterns associated with a specific command, such as bending the knee. Congratulations to Professor Huang on the well-deserved publicity!